Petrine TX



Our hearts in Texas. Our lives in Hell.

petrine.tx@gmail.com

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posters and drawings//apparel//tattoos//American Sharks
Peter Lee.
I’ve been trying to put this skateboard out for years now, but always run into some sort of hurdle. In the mean time, I’ve been skating on it. I still suck.

I’ve been trying to put this skateboard out for years now, but always run into some sort of hurdle. In the mean time, I’ve been skating on it. I still suck.

My book got published in France. I’ll try to get some to Texas.

My book got published in France. I’ll try to get some to Texas.

Some friends reminded me of these concept panties from the archives. They can’t be released for legal reasons.

Some friends reminded me of these concept panties from the archives. They can’t be released for legal reasons.

I found some Four Barres/Bang Screw stickers and threw them in the webstore. Once these are gone, that’ll be the least of them.
http://store.petrinetx.com/

I found some Four Barres/Bang Screw stickers and threw them in the webstore. Once these are gone, that’ll be the least of them.

http://store.petrinetx.com/

Nobody has seen these pictures of Perfect Pussy at East Side Social Center late last year, aside from a few black and white copies in the last issue of Pansexual Cowboys. I didn’t know it at the time, but this would be my last time going to East Side Social Center. It would close down shortly after.

It was almost 10 years ago when I first went to the first incarnation of Sedition Books. I was 15 and it was October. It was on Washington Avenue before that part of town began being littered with townhomes, SUVs, flavored vodka, bars with dress codes, and drunk yuppies in white baseball caps itching for a fight. Washington Avenue used to be lined with shattered glass from broken bottles and car windows. It was a main street with a few known crackhouses, a small coffeeshop, two punk venues, and the Sedition Books Infoshop. The crackhouses, punk venues, and infoshop are gone now, but the coffeeshop would later be joined by a few others up and down the street.

Sedition Books was a place with zines, political books, free coffee, a computer with free internet that people mostly used to check MySpace, and was also a home to a few of the curators. I remember the lock on the front door was a 2x4 laid upon two brackets beside both sides of the door. Sedition would host readings, movies, shows, and community meetings. It would later be burned down by an arsonist.

Sedition Books was reopened on Old Spanish Trail for a small amount of time before moving to a storefront on Richmond across the street from Chapultepec. For some reason I remember that there might have been another temporary location off Main Street next to a speakeasy I used to work at downtown. The people in charge were constantly being voted in and voted out, stepping down, moving away, getting kicked out, not showing up to meetings. In other words, it was like any other infoshop. When Titus and Brianna decided to close their record store on Canal Street and move to South America, the lease was passed onto Sedition Books who changed their name to East Side Social Center.

I went there a lot. I read a lot of zines and donated a lot of merch there. I drank a lot of beer and met a lot of good people. I played a couple shows there and booked a couple shows there, too. I knew it would close down eventually because of the way it was run. Every time I would leave, I would make a mental list of improvements that should be made. Sometimes I thought about taking over the lease because the option had come up a few times. But I was never ready.

East Side Social Center. December 2013.

I remember the day we all quit Amy’s Ice Creams.  J.D. was leaving and we all assumed Airon would be promoted as our manager.  A store meeting was called and we found out that our new managers would be a husband-wife duo we had never met who had been promoted from a store in Austin. If I remember correctly, all but two of us put in our 2-weeks-notice by the end of the next day.  The 2 that stayed behind needed those jobs.

That was the day the punk tradition ended. It wasn’t a widely known fact, but that Amy’s Ice Creams location in Houston was part of the path for many Houston legends. Everyone from the acoustic punk band Rosa on Plan-It-X Records and Punkin Pie had worked there. The international graffiti artist Give Up, famed for his razor blade design, worked there. Local recording/music legend John Sears worked there. Houston bar genius Brad Moore used to work there. Jana Hunter and Will Adams from the Lower Dens worked there. Countless others who eventually became legendary artists, musicians, entrepreneurs, or something else worked at that Amy’s location. If you go there now, the once crazy store full of drunken tattooed misfits has gone the way of much of the neighborhood; whitewashed, medically sanitized, with a hint of Disney Channel and a dash of Urban Outfitters.

During the golden era, shows were booked at the ice cream shop every once in a while. The Sneeze once played there shortly before gracing the cover of Maximum Rock ‘n Roll. Rosa played that show all dressed as bears.  The pictures above were from a show with Ghost Mice and Robert Ellis in 2009. Robert eventually cut his hair and moved to Nashville where he has been doing well as a songwriter. He was nominated for the Americana Songwriter Artist of the Year, Album of the Year, and Song of the Year alongside Jason Isbell and Rosanne Cash. His song was featured on the “No Place Like Home" episode of This American Life.

Chris from Ghost Mice became a friend of mine a few years later through tours and shows. It’s strange how when I was a young teenager, I listened to his records or records he put out, never expecting our lives to ever intersect and then years later I’d open my eyes to see that I’m playing a show with him or he’s sleeping on my floor.

I have thousands of pictures that span from the early 2000s until recent, many which are no longer on the internet. I’ll try to put them up. People want to see them, but I also think it’s fun seeing these pictures after so many years.